Description of Fiberglass Cloth Weaves

Your guide to Fiberglass weaves and the different types we have available

Weaves

Plain weave
In this most simple weave pattern, warp and fill yarns are interlaced over and under each other in alternating fashion. The plain weave provides good stability, porosity and the least yarn slippage for a given yarn count.

Mock Leno
The mock leno weave is used where relatively low numbers of yarns are involved. The leno weave locks the yarns in place by crossing two or more warp threads over each other and interlacing with one or more filling threads.

Four Harness Satin (Crowfoot)
The four harness satin weave is more pliable than the plain weave and is easier to conform to curved surfaces typical in reinforced plastics. In this weave pattern there is a three by one interfacing where a filling yarn floats over three warp yarns and under one.

Eight Harness Satin
The eight harness satin is similar to the four harness satin except that one filling yarn floats over seven warp yarns and under one. This is a very pliable weave and is used for forming over curved surfaces.

Twill weave
This twill weave is more pliable than the plain weave and has better drapability while maintaining more fabric stability than a four or eight harness satin weave. The weave pattern is characterized by a diagonal rib created by one warp yarn floating over at least two filling yarns.

Chrome Finishes (Volan A) F-16 & F-3
Heat cleaned fabric is saturated in a methacrylate chromic chloride solution, cured, and washed to remove any soluble salts. Both F-16 and F-3 are Volan type finishes with F-3 being a high chrome content version. Used with polyesters, phenolics, and epoxies, F-16 and F-3 fabrics make a light green laminate.